North Korea’s Canadian classroom

[We have reported several times before about CanKor Brain Trust member Dr. Park Kyung-Ae‘s Knowledge Partnership Program (KPP), which has recently completed the second year that North Korean economics professors attended economics courses at the University of British Columbia (see links at bottom of this article). The following article is taken from a National Post article by Tristin Hopper, which was published on 2 January 2013. –CanKor]

UBC’s latest exchange with hermit nation quietly draws to a close

The University of British Columbia's campus, which played host to North America's only academic exchange with North Korea. (Photo: Postmedia News files)

The University of British Columbia’s campus, which played host to North America’s only academic exchange with North Korea. (Photo: Postmedia News files)

Two weeks ago, six professors packed up their dorm rooms at the quiet, Vancouver campus of the University of British Columbia, boarded aircraft at the city’s international airport and began the Jacob’s ladder of flights that would eventually return them home to North Korea.

Just as quietly as it began, the second phase of the Knowledge Partnership Program (KPP), North Korea’s only academic exchange program with North America, had come to a close.

It is the product of a little-known relationship forged even before Canada had opened relations with the Stalinist country, and the University of British Columbia is the only academic institution in North America — and possibly the West — to host regular delegations of North Koreans. Little is known of the program and details are carefully guarded from public scrutiny, but just as a U.S. ping pong team helped open Maoist China to the West, proponents contend that one of UBC’s most obscure international programs may hold the key to opening the borders of one of the world’s most closed countries.

“Particularly when we do not have active interactions between Canada and North Korea, I think academic exchange is really needed,” said Kyung-Ae Park, a UBC political scientist and founder of the KPP. Read the rest of this entry »

6 North Korean professors in Canada to study free market

[The following Yonhap news agency article datelined San Francisco, 20 July 2012, appeared in The Korea Times of South Korea. –CanKor]

University of British Columbia Rose Garden

Six professors of leading North Korean universities are staying in Vancouver to study capitalism at a Canadian university on a six-month program, the program director said Friday, drawing fresh attention to the North’s possible transition under its Swiss-educated young leader.The economics professors from three North Korean universities arrived in Canada earlier this month to take courses at the University of British Columbia (UBC) in the fall semester, which begins in September, after a two-month language course, Professor Park Kyung-ae, director of the Center for Korean Research, said.

“They will mainly study international business, economics, finance and trade,” Park told Yonhap News by phone, without giving further details of their identifications.The elite universities include Kim Il-sung University, the top university named after the country’s founding leader, the People’s Economics University and the Pyongyang Foreign Language College, Park said. All the institutions are located in the North’s capital, Pyongyang. Read the rest of this entry »

UBC fosters academic exchange with scholars from North Korea

[For the second year in a row, the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, is hosting six economics professors from the DPRK. The following Program Information comes to us from CanKor Brain Trust member Park Kyung-Ae, as issued by the university’s Public Affairs Department. The North Korean scholars are unavailable to speak to media. However if you wish to speak to a UBC spokesperson, please consult the original July 2012 document here. –CanKor]

Kim Il Sung University, Pyongyang (Photo by David Stanley)

The University of British Columbia is hosting six North Korean professors for six months starting in July 2012 as part of the Canada-Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) Knowledge Partnership Program.The KPP was established in 2011 when a first visit of six professors was organized by Kyung-Ae Park, director of the KPP and a professor of political science at UBC. It aims to foster academic study and knowledge exchange between the two countries.

“This program is an example of how universities can promote constructive engagement through teaching, learning and research,” says Grace Wong, senior advisor international, office of the Provost and Vice President Academic at UBC. “We hope to continue to increase collaborations in the peninsula through our Korean studies programs.” Read the rest of this entry »

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