North Korea as a Nuclear Power and the Prospects of Its Control, by Hans-Joachim Schmidt

[This is a paper for German readers of CanKor. The author, Dr. Hans-Joachim Schmidt, is Senior Research Fellow at the Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung (HSFK) – also known in English as Peace Research Institute Frankfurt/M (PRIF) – and an expert on the Six-Party Talks. Dr. Schmidt is a good friend of CanKor and has previously submitted his work for our benefit. We thank the author for making the full German version of this paper available to CanKor. A brief summary of his latest paper follows here in both English and German. For the full version of the German paper, please follow this link: Nordkorea als Nuklearmacht – Chancen der Kontrolle, or by clicking on the image of the title page below. – CanKor]

North Korea as a Nuclear Power and the Prospects of Its Control

In the latest HSFK-Report, Hans-Joachim Schmidt evaluates the prospects of both cooperative and confrontational approaches against the North Korean nuclear weapons program.

Since its first nuclear test in 2006, a nuclear North Korea cannot be prevented anymore. Therefore, one major aim of international politics must be to delay, constrain and control the North Korean nuclear weapons program.

In HSFK-Report 1/2012, Nordkorea als Nuklearmacht – Chancen der Kontrolle (North Korea as a Nuclear Power and the Prospects of Its Control), Hans-Joachim Schmidt presents the multifaceted regional and global threats of both conventional and nuclear armament of North Korea and analyzes how the North Korean leadership can be urged to follow its international commitments.

He examines problems and prospects of cooperative and confrontational approaches by South Korea, the US, Japan, China and Russia who seek a political arrangement with North Korea regarding nuclear technology. Against the background of their different interests, the author develops specific propositions for a relaunch of the six-party talks following the presidential elections in the USA and South Korea. Read the rest of this entry »

From Sunshine Policy to Sabre-Rattling and Back Again? by Hans-Joachim Schmidt

Satellite image of Korea.

Image via Wikipedia

[The following is a revised and updated version of an introductory lecture presented on 26 April 2011 at a Conference entitled “Collapse or blossoming landscapes? Scenarios for the future of the Korean Peninsula,” which took place at the Evangelical Academy Thuringia in Neudietendorf, Germany. The author, Dr. Hans-Joachim Schmidt, is Senior Research Fellow at the Hessische Stiftung Friedens- und Konfliktforschung (HSFK) – also known in English as Peace Research Institute Frankfurt/M (PRIF) – and an expert on the Six-Party Talks. We thank the author for making the full German version of this paper available to CanKor. An abbreviated version is also being published in Korea Forum, a publication of Korea Verband. –CanKor.]

The following are a few excerpts from the paper’s Introduction, translated into English by Erich Weingartner. For the full version of the German paper, please follow this link: Schmidt: Von der Sonnenscheinpolitik zum Säbelrasslen und zurück

The situation on the Korean Peninsula has clearly worsened since our last conference in 2008. The relationship between the two Koreas has become problematic for the region, with their increasingly confrontational and irreconcilable stance toward each other. China and the USA press North and South toward rapprochement, because they have no interest in further sharpening the confrontation. They don’t want a worsening North-South relationship negatively to affect their bilateral relationship. (…) Read the rest of this entry »

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